ERC-funded projects

Søren T. Skou / Alessio Bricca / Madalina Jäger / Mette Dideriksen / Mette Nyberg / Hanne Rasmussen / Karen H. Andreasson

The MOBILIZE project is investigating the effects of a tailored exercise therapy and education program in addition to current best practice on self-reported, objectively measured and physiological outcomes in people with multimorbidity (i.e. at least two of the following diseases; knee or hip osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart disease (heart failure or coronary heart disease), hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, depression). 

Strong interdisciplinary collaboration involving many different scientific methodologies and a high degree of patient involvement throughout the entire research process are at the heart of the project to ensure relevance to the patients and the health care system and to make sure that the project is implementable in clinical practice afterwards.

This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (MOBILIZE, grant agreement No 801790) ,Næstved, Slagelse and Ringsted Hospitals’ Research Fund and The Association of Danish Physiotherapists Research Fund.

Read more about the project.

Søren T. Skou / Lars H. Tang / Mette Dideriksen

ESCAPE: Evaluation of a patient-centred biopsychosocial blended collaborative care pathway for the treatment of multi-morbid elderly patients

ESCAPE will rethink current practice for treating multimorbidity in elderly patients and break down health care silos that impede integrated care and lead to adverse outcomes. We will coordinate and optimise care, prioritising integration of treatment for mental distress and disorders in the treatment of multimorbidity. Our interdisciplinary multinational consortium of experts from general and hospital medical practice and psychology, health economics, ICT development and social innovation as well as patient and informal carer representatives, will develop a holistic, patient-centred intervention based on the blended collaborative care (BCC) approach and enhanced by cutting-edge information and communication technologies. 

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 945377 (ESCAPE).

The value of physical activity goes back to the ancient Greeks and exercise is clinically recommended and promoted as medicine for different chronic diseases. However, sustaining physical activity is challenging especially for people suffering from chronic illness. Qualitative research might enlighten this paradox. Hence, this project explores the meaningfulness of integrating and sustaining physical activity in life with chronic illness. Furthermore, we aim to develop a narrative framework to better support integration and sustainability of physical activity in everyday life.

Qualitative interview study exploring what is means to CVD patients to participate in a mobile health intervention with text messages and behavior change theory after completion of a cardiac rehabilitation program (the FAIR project). Additionally, it explores experiences with different parts of FAIR and the acceptability of the intervention. Through FAIR, 10-15 patients are recruited to research interviews after 6-7 weeks of intervention and after participation is completed, respectively.

 

Qualitative interview study exploring what is means to CVD patients to participate in a mobile health intervention with text messages and behavior change theory after completion of a cardiac rehabilitation program (the FAIR project). Additionally, it explores experiences with different parts of FAIR and the acceptability of the intervention. Through FAIR, 10-15 patients are recruited to research interviews after 6-7 weeks of intervention and after participation is completed, respectively.

The project is part of a Master’s thesis at the Master of Science in Physiotherapy program at University of Southern Denmark, and is conducted at The Research Unit PROgrez.

Systematic review investigating the effect of eHealth based interventions to maintain physical activity after supervised cardiac rehabilitation. The project will provide an overview of whether eHealth after cardiac rehabilitation is useful for maintaining and active lifestyle.
The project is conducted in collaboration with Department of Occupational- and Physiotherapy, Copenhagen University Hospital.

 

The purpose of the project is to investigate general practitioners’ adherence to clinical guideline recommendations on care for patients with knee osteoarthritis and to get their input on the development of a decision tool to support the recommendations.

A living systematic review with meta-analysis investigating the proportion of patients eligible for knee replacement who postpone, for how long they postpone and what characterizes patients postponing surgery and those having surgery after non-surgical care. PROSPERO registration: https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?RecordID=261850

Traumatic knee joint injuries carry major long-term implications for future knee-related health, representing a major individual and societal burden. Exercise plays an important role in maintaining healthy and strong joints and reducing long-terms debilitating implications. The project aims to promote the delivery of systematic exercise and education by including e-solutions as a first step in the treatment of traumatic knee injuries (ACL and/or meniscus) in adolescents and adults.

This project, involving patients with symptoms of knee osteoarthritis, investigates the effect of on-line delivery of first-line care (i.e. exercise and education), and the experience of on-line treatment, both from the clinicians’ and the patients’ perspective. The project also seeks to better understand the characteristics of patients referred to assessment of knee OA symptoms in secondary care and their ensuing care pathway.

Alternative delivery models (home training, e-solutions, etc.) are frequently suggested as a way to increase rehabilitation attendances in patients with chronic illness. How these models are affected by morbidity and combinations of chronic diseases is, however, unknown. Through access to data from the National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation in the UK (n> 100,000), the use of these delivery models in the context of morbidity and chronic illness will be clarified